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If you’re a developer, you probably have a development server somewhere to test your applications/scripts/apps/whatever, either a bare-metal machine or a VPS or even, god forbids, a Vagrant virtual machine clogging up your CPU. If you have a Tizen RD-PQ device, there is a simple way now to turn your device into a powerful development server.

I’ve written four small bash scripts that allow you to perform all the actions that need to be taken in order to remove the cruft from the Tizen OS (sorry Enlightment guys :( ) and leave you with just the basic tools, on which you can further install all needed development packages. For example, a freshly installed Tizen 2.3.1 installs about 700Mb of stuff on the root partition, from which about 200Mb is actually needed in a development server.

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Categories: Tizen

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Note: Keep in mind that tampering with the probes is a violation of the RIPE Atlas Service Terms and Conditions and I strongly suggest you use the devices in the way they were intended to use, as network monitoring probes.

Last year I’ve applied for a ripe.net Atlas probe that it’s supposed to monitor the health of the internet; from their documentation, With your help, the RIPE NCC is building the largest Internet measurement network ever made. RIPE Atlas employs a global network of probes that measure Internet connectivity and reachability, providing an unprecedented understanding of the state of the Internet in real time.

After keeping it plugged in for more than half an year, I decided to try and do something interesting with it, like dumping the partition info and data for further inspecting and restore it as a router. If you didn’t know, an Atlas probe is actually a TP Link TL-MR3020 router with a custom firmware (and a separate boot/data partition loaded from a USB drive). All internal ports are closed, there is no web interface, so you have no other way to communicate with it except via the on-board serial interface.

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Categories: Hardware, DIY

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Tizen’s boot loader is a small piece of software that is required to perform the basic hardware and peripheral initialization and load the kernel to RAM. For the Tizen platform, the boot loader comes in two parts. The first part is the primary boot loader and the second part is the secondary boot loader. The primary boot loader is the Samsung proprietary boot loader and is also called s-boot. The secondary boot loader is the open source boot loader u-boot, which is customized further for the Tizen platform.
The u-boot settings are extracted from the params.bin file that comes with the mobile_boot target (tizen-2.3.1-mobile_VERSION_mobile_boot.tar.gz usually).

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Categories: Tizen